courses

1.
Parsons School of Design
Integrated Design Program
Course: Research & Development Methods, Integrated Design
2019-present

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course explores hands-on design and 21st century methods. Through iterative investigations of practical form in space, the course mixes analysis of three-dimensional design and prototyping while exploring construction techniques as they are paired with cutting edge computer modeling. A series of projects moves through parametric digital design drawing and rendering, culminating in resolute outcomes that phase through the multiple labs in the Parsons Making Center.

2.
Parsons School of Design
First Year Program
Course: Space & Materiality
2017-present

COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this studio course, students learn through first-hand experience about the close relationship of making to thinking. Students engage with malleability, weight, texture, color, durability, smell, sound, taste, life cycle and social and ecological impacts in a wide variety of projects. Other areas of inquiry, ranging from the organization of space to environmental psychology to object exploration, allow students to discover how materials and their uses shape meaning. Discussion, critique and written responses create class community and idea sharing, while helping students understand their work in historical and cultural contexts. The course has a number of sections each following a particular theme: Community, Culture, Body.

The way we make, makes our world, and in turn, re-makes us.

Class Description (Keyword Spring 2019): Community: defined as a group of people with a common characteristic, interests, or goals and provides us with our most direct means of self-identification. How do our attitudes about what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? This course explores the relationship between shifting boundaries of community and the material nature of social and ecological space, by experimentation, creating of objects, forms and spaces that define and redefine what community may look like in the current circumstance and environment.

Class Description (Keyword 2017-2018): Culture: the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively. This course looks at the idea of culture in two ways: in the generally accepted definition– as an accumulation of ideas, beliefs, artistic practices that define our world. But also in a more focused way through the lens of aesthetics as defined by the Greek word aisthetikos, which describes the idea of sense perception. Through a series of projects we explore how we see and perceive the world and respond to it with objects. Students investigate the relationship between beauty, utility and the hand-made. We work on a series of projects and each generates multiple iterations of a single design. We explore processes of conceiving and building three-dimensional structures using a range of materials that make for quick realization and understand issues of conception and design. This is both a construction technique and three dimensional design course geared toward strengthening a connection to materials and techniques of the discipline.

3.
Westchester Community College
*Course: Sculpture 1
2016-present

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces students to the fundamental sculptural process of addition, subtraction and substitution. Emphasis is on students executing and discussing successful composition, productive conceptualization, and creative problem solving. Assignments include introduction to materials and techniques both traditional (wood, metal, plaster) as well as non-traditional (fabric, latex, found objects, rubber, etc.). Historical and contemporary sculptural works are introduced.

4.
Westchester Community College
Course: Drawing 1
2016-present

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Working with a range of media, students learn to draw from direct observation, with an emphasis on fundamental elements of visual representation, including mass, shape, line, value, and texture, and principals of composition. Drawing is studied as a tool to help enhance powers of observation and imagination, and to cultivate appreciation and understanding of drawing as a form of visual expression. Drawing from the nude human figure is also explored. Lectures and critical discussions challenge students to respond perceptually and conceptually to visual works presented in the studios (including historical examples), and to organize their insights through analysis. Notes: This class is open to all students; no previous art experience is necessary.

5.
Westchester Community College
Course: 3D Design
Fall 2016

COURSE DESCRIPTION
3D Design is an introduction to visual thinking in three-dimensional space. Students explore the interaction of visual principles, materials, and ideas through basic formal processes and techniques. Projects introduce a range of tools and materials with a focus on recognizing and applying compositional principles. Examples of historic and contemporary sculptural works are discussed.

6.
Naugatuk Valley Community College
Course: Sculpture 1
2019-present

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
At the end of the course the student are able to identify the elements of art including form, line, texture, space and color, and the principles balance, harmony, variety, movement/rhythm, emphasis and proportion. Students gain practice in art-making and the use of various techniques and materials.

INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY:
Demonstrations, slide lectures, in-class independent work, collaborative projects, one-on-one as well as group discussions and critiques provide students with techniques to plan and construct sculptural objects as well as analyze and articulate ideas. Written Reflection and self-evaluation are also an integral component of course.

7.
Naugatuk Valley Community College
Course: 3D Design
2019-present

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The objective of the course is to provide the student with mastery in employing the basic elements of design including line, shape/form, color, pattern/texture and space and the basic principles of design used to organize visual space and create a sense of unity. These principles include balance, harmony, variety, movement, emphasis and proportion.

8.
Pratt Institute
Course: Form, Space, Process
2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTION
3D design is the study of form, space, structure, and visual relationships. Students are introduced to the fundamental principals and dynamics of the physical world and a range of materials to develop understanding of their character and appropriateness for particular solutions. The training of the eye, hand and mind results in comprehension and sensitivity to the three dimensional experience. Students demonstrate the ability to analyze and articulate principles, materials and relationships.

The first semester of 3D Design introduces students who have little or no experience in working in three dimensions to the underlying principles and dynamics of the physical world. In addition to basic building processes, this course incorporates SketchUp, hand-drawn skills, InDesign and digital photography. We move through a series of exercises, projects, reading, writing, and lectures to achieve course goals and learning outcomes.

The second semester of 3D Design is “Foundation Design Studio” wherein students apply the principles and knowledge gained in all Foundation courses to pragmatic, expressive and communicative problem solving. Students are introduced to the elements of the design process such as research, empathy, ideation, mapping, prototyping, testing, evaluation, iteration, final product, and presentation and incorporate these into the realization of projects. Students work both individually and collaboratively in teams. The class is designed to address issues of both contemporary design and fine arts practice.

The process of design has become recognized as essential to all art and design practice and has in fact become increasingly used in fields not traditionally seen as art and design disciplines. We live in a designed environment. Not only structures and objects, but also the systems and experiences that define our daily life. Students engage in complex projects that are seen and understood in contexts that extend well beyond the classroom.

There are three expansive projects, each lasting around five weeks. The scale and context of the projects will progress from the scale of the hand, to the scale of the body, to the scale of the group or class, and beyond. The projects make use of previously learned principles in explicit applications. These principles come directly from 3D design, but should involve drawing, LCD, and 4D, and writing as well. One of the objectives of this class is the synthesis of all Foundation experience.

9.
Suffolk County Community College
Course: 3D Design
2015-2019

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces students to the fundamental sculptural process of addition,
subtraction and substitution. Emphasis is on students executing and discussing
successful composition, productive conceptualization, and creative problem solving.
Assignments include introduction to materials and techniques both traditional (wood,
metal, plaster) as well as non-traditional (fabric, latex, found objects, rubber, etc.).
Historical and contemporary sculptural works are introduced.